5 Ways the Hot Girl Walk Can Improve Your Writing

If you’re on TikTok or Instagram, chances are you’ve heard of the Hot Girl Walk. Simply put, the trend elevates the simple exercise of walking into a confidence-boosting ritual and the best part of your daily routine. Popularized by influencer Mia Lind, the Hot Girl Walk is a two to four-mile walk, during which walkers should meditate on gratitude, their goals and ambitions, and—yep, you guessed it—how hot they are. 

 

Not only is The Hot Girl Walk a serious investment in self-love and self-care, but it also boosts heart rate, improves muscle tone, and has a ton of other fitness benefits. In fact, Lind was inspired to rebrand walking as real exercise with real results, noting that it’s often overshadowed by higher impact or cardio-intensive workouts. And in addition to counting as real exercise, the Hot Girl Walk also stands out as an effective writing routine—one that even William Shakespeare and Robert Frost would endorse. Keep reading to discover the Hot Girl Walk’s significance for writers. 

 

Walking improves mental health. 

 

Writers and other creative people are more likely to struggle with depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders. Have you ever anguished over a poem, feeling stressed about how you can’t find the perfect word or craft an evocative, surprising last stanza? Or, do you find yourself deeply affected by writing about past challenges, traumas, and heartbreaks? While writing can be cathartic, it also demands a high level of emotional engagement—which can be exhausting. Walking provides refuge, according to researchers at the University of Mississippi. The study found that even a 10-minute walk positively enhanced mood.

 

Walking increases blood flow to the brain.

 

Feeling stagnant and uncreative in your writing—like you’re constantly using the same words, metaphor systems, or poetic forms? It turns out walking can help you operate at a higher cognitive level. A research team at New Mexico Highlands University found that walking led to an increase in blood flow to the brain, which “may optimize brain function.”

 

Walking energizes us. 

 

It might not be a physical workout, but writing wears us out. When you need a wake-up call, turn to the Hot Girl Walk. A 2018 study published in the Ecopsychology journal noted that walking in an outdoor setting for 15 minutes led to an increase in energy levels. Next time you feel like taking a nap, try taking a Hot Girl Walk, instead. 

 

Walking is rhythmic.

 

Writing is a multisensory practice. Instead of just seeing their words scrawled in their notebooks or typed on their laptops, poets can benefit from hearing their stanzas aloud or feeling their rhythm. In fact, the poetry teaching resource Poets Voice emphasizes how poetry hinges on “walking the line physically, creatively, politically, thus developing one’s individual rhythm and pace.” Walking can help poets develop line breaks and feel out poetic meter (after all, iambs are also called feet). Poet Edward Hirsch has written about how the rhythmic nature of walking has helped him memorize poems. Decades later, poet Hadara Bar-Nadav spoke about how writing has helped her process in an interview with Kansas City Public Radio: “As I was walking, I decided on what the correct revision was,” she said of a poem. “Because I could hear the rhythm differently.”

 

Walking can help us find solitude. 

 

If you’re a millennial or Gen-Z poet, you probably live with roommates. Even if you live alone, you’re probably used to being in and out of meetings, classes, and more. With all of the people and forces vying for our time, it’s increasingly difficult to spend quality time alone. Walking presents a solution. The solitude that walking provides helps people tap into their internal worlds and escape into their thoughts, an absolutely necessary ritual for poets. Donald Hall, an award-winning poet who published more than 20 collections, wrote in The New Yorker about how walking helped him find crucial alone time: “Exeter was academically difficult and made Harvard easy, but I hated it—five hundred identical boys living two to a room. Solitude was scarce, and I labored to find it. I took long walks alone.”

 

Much like the Hot Girl Walk, yoga can improve mindfulness, reduce stress, and more. After a walk, when you’re ready to stay still and grounded, try out our yoga pose and poetry pairings.

The post 5 Ways the Hot Girl Walk Can Improve Your Writing appeared first on Read Poetry.

The Wheels On the Bus Go Rounds and Round | @Cocomelon – Nursery Rhymes | Kids Learning Videos

Bounce along in the bus all over town with this favourite nursery rhyme!

Click the link to subscribe for more!
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1QqdFv5e9QSEi0eYdfwuqw?sub_confirmation=1

Moonbug TV – How To Nursery Rhymes.
The very best nursery rhymes and kids songs for you to sing dance and learn too! Join us for fantastic kids learning videos for preschool education and learning from home.

Stay tuned for weekly kids learning videos such as Wheels On The Bus, Baby Shark, and many many more classic and original children’s songs!

Lyrics:

The wheels on the bus go round and round
Round and round
Round and round
The wheels on the bus go round and round
All through the town

The doors on the bus go open and shut
Open and shut
Open and shut
The doors on the bus go open and shut
All through the town

The wipers on the bus go swish, swish, swish
Swish, swish, swish
Swish, swish, swish
The wipers on the bus go swish, swish, swish
All through the town

The signals on the bus go blink, blink, blink
Blink, blink, blink
Blink, blink, blink
The signals on the bus go blink, blink, blink
All through the town

The horn on the bus goes beep, beep, beep
Beep, beep, beep
Beep, beep, beep
The horn on the bus goes beep, beep, beep
All through the town

The motor on the bus goes vroom, vroom vroom
Vroom, vroom, vroom
Vroom, vroom, vroom
The motor on the bus goes vroom, vroom, vroom
All through the town

The people on the bus go up and down
Up and down
Up and down
The people on the bus go up and down
All through the town

The babies on the bus go “Wah, wah, wah!”
“Wah, wah, wah!”
“Wah, wah, wah!”
The babies on the bus go “Wah, wah, wah!”
All through the town

The mommies on the bus go “Shh, shh, shh!”
“Shh, shh, shh!”
“Shh, shh, shh!”
The mommies on the bus go “Shh, shh, shh!”
All through the town

The daddies on the bus go “I love you!”
“I love you!”
“I love you!”

© El Bebe Productions Limited

Old MacDonald | CoComelon Nursery Rhymes & Kids Songs

Baby is visiting his grandpa on the farm and having so much fun learning about all the animals and the sounds that they make! Sing along!
https://www.youtube.com/c/Cocomelon?sub_confirmation=1

Lyrics:

Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O!
And on this farm he had a horse
E-I-E-I-O!
With a neigh neigh here
And a neigh neigh there
Here a neigh, there a neigh,
Everywhere a neigh neigh!
Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O!

Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O!
And on this farm he had a cow
E-I-E-I-O!
With a moo moo here
And a moo moo there
Here a moo, there a moo,
Everywhere a moo moo!
Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O!

Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O!
And on this farm he had a pig
E-I-E-I-O!
With an oink oink here
And an oink oink there
Here an oink, there an oink,
Everywhere an oink oink!
Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O!

Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O!
And on this farm he had a sheep
E-I-E-I-O!
With a baa baa here
And a baa baa there
Here a baa, there a baa,
Everywhere a baa baa!
Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O!

Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O!
And on this farm he had a chicken
E-I-E-I-O!
With a cluck cluck here
And a cluck cluck there
Here a cluck, there a cluck,
Everywhere a cluck cluck!
Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O!

Old MacDonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O!
And on this farm he had a duck
E-I-E-I-O!
With a quack quack here
And a quack quack there
Here a quack, there a quack,
Everywhere a quack quack!
Old Macdonald had a farm
E-I-E-I-O!

About Cocomelon:

Where kids can be happy and smart!

At Cocomelon, our goal is to help make learning a fun and enjoyable experience for kids by creating beautiful 3D animation, educational lyrics, and toe-tapping music.

Kids will laugh, dance, sing, and play along with our videos, learning letters, numbers, animal sounds, colors, and much, much more while simply enjoying our friendly characters and fun stories.

We also make life easier for parents who want to keep their kids happily entertained, giving you the peace of mind that your children are receiving quality educational content. Our videos also give you an opportunity to teach and play with your children as you both watch!

WEBSITE: http://www.Cocomelon.com
FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Cocomelonkids
INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/cocomelon_official/
TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/Cocomelonkids

Copyright © Treasure Studio, Inc. All rights reserved.

Tonight I Can Write the Saddest Lines – Pablo Neruda (A Poem for Broken Hearts)

Read by Shane Morris

‘Tonight I Can Write the Saddest Lines’ is a heart-breaking poem written by the beloved Chilean Poet Pablo Neruda.

In these verses Neruda describes how easy it is for him to write the “saddest lines” as he struggles to cope with the loss of his girlfriend after a break-up.

In the end, Neruda says that these lines serve as his last goodbye to his love.

#pabloneruda #poem

5 Poetry Collections to Read If You Love Sally Rooney

If you’re a book lover, chances are you can’t stop spotting Sally Rooney novels on social media, in the front windows at your local bookstore, and even on your TV screen—Conversations With Friends was released as a Hulu series in May, while Normal People continues to attract new viewers two years after its premiere. With Rooney’s latest title, Beautiful World Where Are You, hitting shelves last September, it’s unlikely we’ll see a new book from the author for a while. If you’re looking to fill the Rooney void left on your reading list, start with these five poetry collections that explore similar themes and feelings. 

 

 

An Anthology of Modern Irish Poetry, edited by Wes Davis

 

In an interview with The Irish Times, Rooney said, “The material reality of [my] characters has to be grounded in stuff that I actually know. It’s the same reason that all my characters are Irish. I’m Irish. I live in Ireland. Most of my friends are Irish. I feel more grounded in that reality.”

 

Rooney invites her readers into that reality, as well, with her novels’ Irish settings resulting in a strong sense of place and a unique literary voice—influencing everything from the books’ dialogue to their sharp class analysis. While Rooney is the most widely known Irish writer publishing right now, An Anthology of Modern Irish Poetry offers an opportunity to get to know a wide range of diverse Irish voices. 

 


See on Bookshop.org

 

Unfollowing You by Komal Kapoor

 

The characters at the heart of Sally Rooney’s novels have complicated and ever-changing relationships. In Conversations With Friends, protagonist Bobbi considers the differences between platonic and romantic love—as well as their intersections—and finds herself exploring the limitations and complexities of marriage and monogamy. Meanwhile, in Normal People, the painful but deep connection between Marianne and Connell spans many years and cities. With Beautiful World Where Are You, Rooney shows her characters grappling with long-standing crushes, unrequited love, and more. The relationships in these novels are impacted by dating apps and social media, which similarly play a major role in Komal Kapoor’s collection Unfollowing You. Like Rooney’s novels, Kapoor’s poems also take the reader on a journey—chronicling both a romantic coming together and a heartbreaking falling apart—and try to make sense of modern love and dating. 

 

unfollowing you
See on Bookshop.org

 

Scorpio by Katy Bohinc

 

Rooney has often spoken out about rampant capitalism, wealth inequality, and exploitation, with class divides between her characters serving as major inflection points in her novels. Her characters struggle to pay rent, find themselves in monotonous day jobs, and reflect on the intricate, deep-seated shame that can arise when they compare themselves to wealthier friends and partners. Katy Bohinc’s Scorpio, published by Miami University Press, speaks to like-minded, emotional themes, with Bohinc writing, “Because I go to so many / bullshit meetings all day long / I want / a literary song.” Like Rooney’s characters, the speaker of Bohinc’s poems strives to find meaning even in the midst of desperate survival and soul-sucking routine. 

 

See on Bookshop.org

 

God I Feel Modern Tonight by Catherine Cohen

 

Rooney has been hailed as a distinctly millennial voice. Generational issues come through in all of her books, with each representing our current time period and historical context. Comedian and poet Catherine Cohen’s God I Feel Modern Tonight has a similar point of view, delving into timely topics like hookup culture, self-care, social media, and the COVID-19 pandemic. The dark humor in each poem also mirrors Rooney’s writing style. 

 


See on Bookshop.org

 

Steal It Back by Sandra Simonds

 

How do womanhood and femininity intersect with consumerism? This serves as a central question in Sandra Simonds Steal It Back, the award-winning leftist poet’s fourth collection. Rooney’s characters engage in similar debate and reflection, questioning how what they choose to buy relates to questions of morality and social responsibility. It’s easy to envision Rooney nodding in agreement with Simonds’ searing societal critique, which takes aim at everything from McDonald’s to Twitter. 

 


See on Bookshop.org

 

Looking for more fiction and poetry pairings? Check out our round-up featuring recs for fans of The Handmaid’s Tale, The Hate U Give, and more.

The post 5 Poetry Collections to Read If You Love Sally Rooney appeared first on Read Poetry.